Tim Kaine

Summary

Article Title
CNN, Some Person et al.October 6, 2020 (Short)

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Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

Terry McAullife

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Overview: N/A

Ralph Northam

An extraordinary reconvened session
Virginia Mercury, Bob JonesOctober 8, 2020 (Short)

Lawmakers delay minimum wage, maintain election schedule in extraordinary session

Protesters in cars honked endlessly as they circled the Capitol. The Speaker of the House collapsed on the dais as she led a floor session. A lawmaker cast votes from a Plexiglas enclosure.

The typically sleepy reconvened session of the Virginia General Assembly on Thursday fully reflected the bizarre world into which we’ve all been thrust by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“If anyone in this room is going to die from the virus if they get it, it’s me,” said Sen. George Barker, D-Fairfax, who worked from the transparent enclosure constructed by Senate staff. He said he was still recovering from open heart surgery and a bout of pneumonia.

Current Position: Governor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor from 2014 – 2018; State Senator for VA Senate District 6 from 2008 – 2014

“Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service. He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.”

Source: Government page

Governor of Virginia

The Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. The current holder of the office is Democrat Ralph Northam, who was sworn in on January 13, 2018.

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as "The Honorable", but may occasionally be referred to as "Excellency" if ceremonially appropriate.

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Mark Warner

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006

Overview: N/A

Tim KaineTim Kaine

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

Summary

Article Title
CNN, Some Person et al.October 6, 2020 (Short)

Article text

Top News

Summary

Article Title
CNN, Some Person et al.October 6, 2020 (Short)

Article text

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

About

Tim Kaine 1

Source: Government page

Tim Kaine has helped people throughout his life as a missionary, civil rights lawyer, teacher and elected official. He is one of 30 people in American history to have served as a Mayor, Governor and United States Senator.

Early Commitment to Public Service

Tim grew up working in his father’s ironworking shop in Kansas City. His parents taught him the value of hard work and showed him how small businesses and technical skills strengthen this country every day. After graduating from the University of Missouri, Tim started his public service career by running a technical school founded by Jesuit missionaries in Honduras. He trained teenagers to become carpenters and welders, equipping them with skills to lift up themselves and their communities. As Tim says, his work in Honduras was “a North Star” that led to his commitment to advance job opportunities for everyone. His time there reinforced three core values that are still a central part of his life today: “Fè, familia, y trabajo” – “Faith, family, and work.”

Family Life

Tim met Virginian Anne Holton at Harvard Law School and they married in 1984 in the same church in Richmond they attend to this day. They have three adult children. Anne, a former legal aid lawyer and juvenile court judge, served as Virginia Secretary of Education from 2014 until 2016. Before that, Anne ran Great Expectations, a program that offers tutoring, career coaching, and other services to help young adults aging out of foster care and attending Virginia community colleges transition to successful, independent adulthood. She now teaches education policy and government at George Mason University – Tim calls her the best public servant he knows. Anne’s father Linwood Holton, a former Republican Governor of Virginia, was critical to integrating Virginia’s public schools, putting the Commonwealth on the path to progress we see today.

Early Career

After law school, Tim practiced law in Richmond for 17 years, specializing in the representation of people who had been denied housing due to their race, disability, or family status. In 1998, Tim helped win one of the largest civil rights jury verdicts ever in a case involving discrimination against minority neighborhoods by an insurance company. He also began teaching law part-time at the University of Richmond in 1987.

Elected Office

Tim was first elected to office in 1994, serving as a city council member and four years later, Mayor of Richmond. When he was first elected to City Council in Richmond, the city had one of the highest homicide rates in America, and he worked with law enforcement and the community to find solutions that brought down the rate of violent crime. He became Lieutenant Governor of Virginia in 2002 and was inaugurated as Virginia’s 70th Governor in 2006. While serving as Governor, Tim improved the education and health care systems, and by the end of his term, leading publications ranked Virginia the best state to raise a child and the best state for business. He visited a school in every county and city in the Commonwealth and helped Virginia make it through the worst recession since the Great Depression. He also responded to the tragic shooting at Virginia Tech by strengthening Virginia’s background check system and pushing his legislature to do more to make communities safer.

In the Senate

Tim was elected to the Senate in 2012 as a can-do optimist skilled in bringing people together across old lines of party, race, or region. Tim has spent his time in the Senate focused on improving the lives of Virginians. He has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. As co-chair of the bipartisan Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, Tim focuses on expanding access to job-training programs to ensure that students of all ages are prepared with the skills they need for the jobs of the modern economy. Tim has helped lead efforts in the Senate to reduce unemployment for military families and veterans. As a member of the Armed Services Committee, a Senator from one of the states most closely connected to the military, and the father of a Marine, Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. He works to ensure that the military has the resources it needs to keep the country safe and that servicemembers and veterans receive the benefits and care they have earned. He has also been the leading voice against Presidents starting wars without a vote by Congress. Tim believes that health care is a right, not something reserved just for those who can afford it, and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care. This includes legislation to give Americans more options for affordable health insurance and to combat the opioid abuse epidemic. Tim serves on Senate Committees where he is able to work on those priorities every day for Virginians: the Armed Services; Budget; Foreign Relations; and Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committees. He is Ranking Member of the Armed Services Readiness Subcommittee and the Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Near East, South Asia, Central Asia, and Counterterrorism.

For more information: Wikipedia  Open Secrets   Balletopia

Experience

Work Experience

  • Lawyer
  • Law school teacher
    University of Richmond
    1987

Education

  • JD
    Harvard Law School
    1983

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C. Office
231 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: (202) 224-4024
Fax: (202) 228-6363

Manassas, Virginia office
9408 Grant Avenue, Suite 202
Manassas, VA 20110
Phone: (703) 361-3192
Fax: (703) 361-3198 G

Virginia Beach, Virginia office
222 Central Park Avenue Suite 120
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Phone: (757) 518-1674
Fax: (757) 518-1679

Web

Campaign Site, Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Recent Elections

2018 US Senator

Tim Kaine (D) 1,910,370 57.0%
Corey Stewart (R) 1,374,313 41.0%
Matt J. Waters (L) 61,565 1.8%
Write In (Write-in) 5,125 0.2%
TOTAL 3,351,373

2012 US Senator

Tim Kaine (D) 2,010,067 52.8%
George Allen (R) 1,785,542 46.9%
Write In (Write-in) 9,410 0.2%
TOTAL 3,805,019

2005 Governor

Tim Kaine (D) 1,025,942 51.7%
J. W. Kilgore (R) 912,327 46.0%
H. R. Potts, Jr () 43,953 2.2%
Wirte In (Write-in) 1,556 .1%
TOTAL 1,983,778

2001 Lt. Governor

Tim Kaine (D) 925,974 50.3%
J. K. Katzen (R) 883,886 48.1%
G. A. Reams (L) 28,783 1.6%
Write In (Write-in) 490
TOTAL 1,839,133

Finances

KAINE, TIMOTHY M (TIM) has run in 5 races for public office, winning 4 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $627,777,400

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Armed Services
Budget Committee
Foreign Relations
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: BillTrack 50

Issues

Governance

Budget

Tim supports a smart and balanced approach to budgeting that funds our national defense, children’s health care, education, substance abuse prevention, and other key programs. He has become a leader in helping Congress come to bipartisan, multi-year spending agreements that fund these critical domestic priorities and the military.

Tim is a supporter of two-year budgeting, a process he used as Governor of Virginia, to help businesses and agencies plan ahead and save money. Since taking office, Tim has raised concerns about the negative effects crisis-to-crisis budgeting has on the nation’s economy, and he has done everything he can to roll back the non-strategic sequester cuts that have been hurting our national security and communities across Virginia. Tim believes fiscal policy should not be determined by political brinksmanship, and he opposes across-the-board cuts that hurt key priorities like education and health care, hampering our economic growth. Tim will continue to fight back against any efforts to slash funding for Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security — programs that offer a critical lifeline for seniors, people with disabilities, and the most vulnerable Americans. Tim is committed to finding common ground on budget reforms that strengthen the economy over the long run. He has always believed we should combine targeted spending reductions with strategic revenues by reducing tax loopholes. Tim was disappointed with the partisan Republican tax bill passed in December of 2017, which is projected to add more than $1.5 trillion to the deficit over the next 10 years while prioritizing big breaks to large corporations and those at the top over hardworking Virginia families. Tim supports reforms to the tax code that put middle-class families and small businesses first.

Civil Rights

As a former civil rights attorney, Tim has spent his career fighting for the rights of all Americans. He and his wife Anne have dedicated their careers to making Virginia a place that provides equal opportunity for everyone, and he’ll keep fighting in Congress until the federal government ensures equal voting rights, equal pay, and protection against discrimination no matter one’s race, sex, nation of origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, or age.

As Senator, Tim has pushed to ensure the protection of fundamental freedoms for all Americans. He has worked to protect minority groups from discrimination in housing, the workplace, and education. He is committed to ensuring equal treatment for all Americans under the law. Concerned by the lack of recognition of African American history, Tim led efforts to propose a commission commemorating 400 years of African American history in the United States. Tim partnered with the NAACP, Congressman Bobby Scott, and a bipartisan group of Senators to announce legislation to create this commission, which passed into law in 2017.

As Governor, he promoted equal protection by banning discrimination against state employees on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, age, political affiliation, veteran status or disability.

Women’s Rights

Tim has been a strong voice for women’s equality. He believes we must permanently end a culture where a woman who speaks out faces doubt or retribution about experiences with sexism, harassment, and assault. Tim has pledged his support for women everywhere who fear coming forward. He has called on the Senate to hold hearings on sexual harassment and assault in the workplace and successfully called for the public release of data on the Senate’s sexual harassment claims and settlements. Tim believes our nation is not doing nearly enough to address the fact that women still do not have an equal role in many areas of our society. He also co-sponsored the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which was signed into law in 2013. As Lieutenant Governor and Governor, he made it a priority to update laws on sexual violence and improve the treatment of survivors.

Tim supports the constitutional right of women to make their own reproductive choices. He opposes efforts to weaken Roe v. Wade and defund Planned Parenthood, an organization that 22,000 Virginians rely on for health care. He is an original cosponsor of legislation to restore the contraceptive coverage requirement guaranteed by the Affordable Care Act.

Tim co-sponsored the Paycheck Fairness Act because he strongly believes men and women must be paid equally for the same work. The current inequity amounts to hundreds of thousands of dollars lost over a woman’s lifetime. As every dollar counts for families trying to make ends meet, gender-based discrimination harms the well-being of families and households — which depend on the wages of working mothers as well as working fathers — across the country.

Criminal Justice Reform

Tim has worked hard to improve the criminal justice system and strengthen police relationships with local communities. He is concerned about persisting racial inequalities in the criminal justice system and believes Congress must do more to address them.  In the Senate, Tim has supported legislation to reduce over-incarceration, including the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act, a bipartisan compromise bill to reduce over-incarceration and improve community safety by reforming “three-strike” laws and expanding access to rehabilitation and reentry programs. Tim believes our nation must improve the way it treats mental illness and addiction so those who need treatment do not end up in local jails that lack the resources necessary to deliver care.

Tim believes that by investing in education and skills-training opportunities for those in the federal, state, and local prison systems, society can help reduce repeat offenses and give formerly incarcerated individuals a chance at a successful life. He is an advocate for drug courts and programs that emphasize treatment over incarceration for non-violent drug offenders. He has also worked to strengthen financial protections for men and women seeking to reenter society after leaving prison, urging the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to protect inmates from predatory practices.

Democracy

Voting Rights

Tim believes that voting is a fundamental right in our democracy that must be protected. He was extremely disappointed by the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder to gut key provisions of the Voting Rights Act. For decades, the Voting Rights Act was responsible for dramatically increasing minority voting, and, in turn, minority representation. He has voiced concern that since the weakening of the law, many states have limited access to the ballot box through voter ID laws by limiting weekend voting, closing voting locations, and stripping voter rolls. In response, Tim joined colleagues to introduce legislation that would restore and protect Americans’ Constitutional right to vote. Tim is also concerned about the use of partisan gerrymandering to disenfranchise minority voters and will continue be a strong advocate for nonpartisan redistricting.

Economy

Jobs & the Economy

Tim is focused on creating economic opportunity for all Virginians. He believes that by supporting small businesses, raising wages, improving education and workforce training, and investing in new industries, the United States will continue to be a global economic leader.

Tim supports raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour because he believes no family working full time should live in poverty. He believes all Americans should have access to good jobs that put them on the path to economic success, and he supports strengthening workforce training programs to help make that goal a reality. Drawing from his experience in Virginia, Honduras, and his dad’s ironworking shop, Tim has been a leader in the Senate on efforts to support skills-training programs that prepare workers for good-paying, in-demand jobs. Tim co-founded the bipartisan Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus and has championed legislation — including bills that have become law — to expand students’ access to high-quality CTE programs and help prepare American workers for jobs in the modern economy, including in the cybersecurity industry.

Tim sees small businesses as the drivers of job creation and economic growth in Virginia and across the nation. He supports policies to help them grow and thrive by increasing their access to capital and lowering barriers to entry for minority entrepreneurs. Tim has been an advocate for women- and minority-owned businesses as well as companies that provide opportunities for veterans, military families, and people with disabilities. He is a strong supporter of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and is concerned about the largest banks getting bigger while the number of small community banks continues to decline. Tim has supported a bill to prevent this consolidation and expand consumer protections for servicemembers, veterans, those with impaired credit, seniors, and people hurt by data breaches. This legislation will help Virginians in rural and underserved communities secure loans to buy a home, send their kids to college, and start small businesses.

Tim has long supported smart tax reforms that provide relief to middle-class families and make the tax code fairer and simpler. He was disappointed that the partisan Republican tax law prioritized corporations and those at the top over hardworking Virginians.

Virginia has served as a model for the nation by prioritizing investments in education and workforce training, as well as embracing global fair trade, which led to the international expansion of Virginia businesses. Tim believes that we can strengthen America’s economic recovery and create jobs by embracing the growth strategies that have worked in the Commonwealth. Tim served as Governor of Virginia during the worst recession since the Great Depression. Throughout his term, Virginia maintained one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation, and Tim helped recruit several major employers to move to the Commonwealth. During his tenure as Governor, Virginia was named the best state for business in America.

Agriculture

Tim is a strong advocate for Virginia’s farmers. Agriculture and forestry comprise the largest industry in the Commonwealth, contributing $91 billion to the economy and supporting more than 442,000 jobs. He supports a robust farm safety net, protecting our natural resources, and defending federal nutrition assistance that helps the neediest among us.

Tim was a major proponent of the most recent farm bill, the Agricultural Act of 2014, which strengthened crop insurance, maintained the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance (SNAP) program and other nutrition aid, advanced partnerships with farmers to reduce runoff in impaired watersheds like the Chesapeake Bay, expanded agricultural export markets, and bolstered local food networks to allow more businesses and consumers to buy from local farmers — all while saving $23 billion over the next decade. Tim has stood up for Virginia’s farmers throughout his time in the Senate, working on efforts to lift the unfair Chinese ban on Virginia poultry that has persisted on and off, and supporting reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank, which helps small and mid-sized Virginia farmers and agricultural exporters sell their goods abroad. Tim has raised serious concerns about President Trump’s actions that could threaten Virginia agricultural products and thousands of jobs. Tim has also worked to secure federal funding for agricultural research, so that top-flight institutions like Virginia Tech and Virginia State University can continue to develop new, effective methods of farming.

From his time as Governor, Tim has worked to defend the Chesapeake Bay, a cornerstone of the Virginia economy that supports the tourism, recreation, and seafood aquaculture industries. He has fought back against President Trump’s plans to slash Chesapeake Bay funding and introduced bipartisan legislation to direct more funds within the farm bill’s conservation title to top-priority watersheds like the Bay.

Education

Education

Tim believes that we must improve access to quality education if we want to prepare students and workers for success in the modern economy. He supports smart investments in education — from pre-kindergarten to college and workforce training — and has learned through years of experience in Virginia that no one path is right for everyone. Drawing from his years working in his dad’s ironworking shop and his experience teaching in Honduras, a key focus of Tim’s work in public service has been strengthening career and technical education (CTE) programs that teach students skills to succeed in high-demand, good-paying jobs.

Tim believes a well-educated population is the key to having the most talented nation on earth. Under Tim’s leadership as Governor, Virginia’s innovative investments in education turned the Commonwealth into a magnet for talent. Through decades of experience, Tim learned that a huge part of remaining an attractive location for emerging industries and expanding businesses is having a skilled workforce.

To return America to the top country in the world for education, Tim supports reforms like broadening our early childhood education system, strengthening our K-12 public schools, supporting high-quality teachers and school leaders, renewing our focus on career and technical education, and dramatically reducing the cost of college. As Governor, he expanded the number of children enrolled in Pre-K by nearly 40 percent and helped expand the number of college and university facilities in Virginia to attract top students and faculty. In 2007, under Tim’s leadership, Education Week ranked Virginia the state where a child was most likely to succeed.

In the Senate, Tim has made improving America’s education system a central focus of his work, playing an instrumental role in the bipartisan Senate education reform bill, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This legislation decreased the emphasis on standardized testing and gave states more flexibility. It also included provisions Tim wrote to help prevent sexual assault and improve access to K-12 career and technical education programs. Tim is a founder and co-chair of the Senate CTE Caucus, which promotes improving access to career and technical education programs to ensure students of all ages are prepared with the skills they need for the jobs of the 21st century. Tim knows that not everyone’s path to a successful career will or should go through a four-year college, and he is working to create a better understanding of the critical role CTE and workforce training programs play in growing our economy. In addition to his provisions enacted into law, Tim has sponsored several pieces of legislation to raise the quality of CTE programs at schools in Virginia and across the country.

Tim is concerned about the overwhelming burden of student loan debt on millions of Americans, and he’s supported policies to expand access to affordable higher education, improve financial aid, offer loan forgiveness for public service workers, and help students understand their debt obligations upfront. An estimated 56% of Virginia college students graduate with student debt. Key parts of Tim’s legislation to give public servants like servicemembers and teachers the debt relief they earned passed into law in 2018, and he will continue pushing for solutions so Americans are not held back by mountains of debt.

Environment

Environment and Energy

Tim believes that America’s energy production should always be trending in the direction of cleaner tomorrow than today.

From the Chesapeake Bay to the Cumberland Gap, Virginia’s great outdoors are a priceless treasure that Tim is determined to safeguard for future generations to enjoy. Tim has long been an outspoken leader in support of clean energy and policies to combat climate change. As Governor, Tim put in place the Commonwealth’s first comprehensive clean energy plan. He supports investing in renewable energy, including offshore wind and solar, which would create new jobs and make Virginia a leader in clean energy development. Tim believes that by advancing an energy strategy that moves us from carbon-heavy to low-carbon, we can reduce pollution, bolster our national security, and create American jobs that cannot be outsourced.

After hearing concerns from local communities and the Department of Defense, Tim announced his opposition to opening Virginia’s coast to offshore oil and gas drilling. Tim has spoken out against the Trump Administration’s offshore drilling proposal that could threaten military assets in Hampton Roads as well as the environment and tourism industry. Tim has called on the Administration to listen to local voices on Virginia’s coast, which are overwhelmingly opposed to offshore drilling.

Virginia faces a unique set of challenges because of its coastal exposure to sea level rise caused by climate change, and Tim is committed to reducing this risk. He believes the U.S. should be an international leader on climate change and that President Trump’s decision to retreat from the Paris Climate Agreement is short-sighted. Tim believes the country that won World War II and the race to put a man on the moon should be able to cut approximately 1/4th of our carbon pollution by 2025. In the Senate, Tim has been a leader on efforts to combat sea level rise and flooding in Hampton Roads, which threaten readiness at local military installations and homes in the surrounding communities. Tim introduced the BUILD Resilience Act, which would spur investments in resilient infrastructure to reduce the risk of climate effects like flooding and extreme storms to communities like Hampton Roads. He has also been an advocate for protecting the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia’s National Parks like Shenandoah, its National Wildlife Refuges like Chincoteague, and its truly unique places like Tangier Island.

Tim respects the role coal production has historically played in traditional coal communities in Southwest Virginia, and as Governor, he supported the construction of the state-of-the-art Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center in Wise County, one of the most advanced clean coal plants in the United States. He recognizes the sacrifice coal miners have made over a lifetime of dangerous work, and he is fighting on behalf of them in the Senate so they receive their hard-earned pensions and health benefits. Tim has supported clean coal research funding that could help revitalize Southwest Virginia’s economy, and he has co-sponsored legislation to stimulate large-scale federal and private sector investment to reduce carbon pollution through advanced clean coal technologies.

Tim has also pushed for robust funding for heating assistance programs. He has continually joined colleagues of both parties to urge the President and Senate appropriators to boost funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), two programs that play an important role in providing vulnerable populations and low-income households with affordable home energy.

Health Care

Tim believes that health care is a right. He remains committed to protecting the Affordable Care Act and improving the health care system to give all Americans access to quality health care they can afford. Tim has fought tirelessly against efforts by President Trump and Republicans in Congress to take health care away from millions of Americans, including Virginians with pre-existing conditions.

Tim supports giving Americans more options for affordable health insurance, and he has co-authored a proposal to do just that: Medicare-X. Medicare-X would create a low-cost public option for health care, available in every ZIP code, allowing Americans to choose between the existing private insurance plans or a public one. Medicare-X would build on the Medicare framework of doctors to establish a public insurance plan offered on the individual and small business health exchanges. The Medicare-X plan initially would be available in areas where there is a shortage of insurers or higher health care costs due to less competition—including rural communities—then expand to every ZIP code in the country.

Tim believes we must do more to lower health care costs while improving the quality of care through promoting preventive care, effectively using new technology, paying our health care providers by patient outcomes, and finding ways to reduce defensive medicine and lower malpractice premiums without taking rights away from injured people. Tim opposed President Trump’s actions that sabotaged the health care system and increased costs for Virginians. Recognizing that measures are now needed to stabilize the markets in the wake of President Trump’s reckless decisions, Tim worked across the aisle on legislation to do just that.

Tim is a strong supporter of Medicare and Medicaid — critical programs that provide health care and economic security to seniors, people with disabilities, and the most vulnerable Americans. He continues to fight against any efforts to dismantle these programs and has been a vocal supporter for Medicaid expansion in Virginia, which will provide hundreds of thousands of people with access to care. He has also introduced bipartisan legislation to help combat Alzheimer’s disease and support caregivers who sacrifice so much to help their loved ones. Tim has championed bipartisan legislation to fund pediatric cancer research, named in honor of Gabriella Miller of Loudoun County, a powerful advocate for pediatric research who passed away from a brain tumor at the age of 10. The bill became law in 2014 and has already provided $50 million for the Pediatric Research Initiative Fund.

Tim is also closely focused on the drug and opioid addiction crisis harming communities across Virginia and the nation. From the coalfields in Southwest Virginia to the suburbs in Fairfax County, he has heard from families who have lost children to drug overdoses, law enforcement officers who are facing increases in drug-related crimes, and businesses who struggle to find workers who can pass a drug test. He has introduced bipartisan legislation to help reduce opioid overdose deaths through improved access to the life-saving drug naloxone, a bill to hold the FDA accountable for the approval of new, potentially dangerous opioid drugs, and a bill to incorporate job training into drug addiction recovery programs.

Immigration

Immigration

Tim knows that for far too long, our immigration system has unfairly kept millions of people who contribute to the United States living in the shadows of our society. He has spoken out forcefully against the Trump Administration’s treatment of Dreamers, discriminatory travel bans, proposals to limit legal immigration, and attempts to tear families apart.

Tim strongly opposed President Trump’s decision to end the DACA program, which allowed recipients—known as Dreamers—who were brought here at a young age, to live, work and study in their communities without fear of deportation. After Trump ended DACA and left Dreamers in limbo, Tim helped lead the bipartisan negotiations to find a solution that protected Dreamers, create a path to citizenship, and boost border security. Their proposal received bipartisan support from the majority of Senators but did not receive the 60 votes needed to pass after the Trump Administration announced its opposition to the bill. Tim is also a strong supporter of the Dream Act that would protect Dreamers from deportation and create a path to citizenship.

Tim supported the Senate’s comprehensive immigration reform bill in 2013, bipartisan legislation to provide a better visa system to encourage growth of a talented workforce, protect Dreamers, enhance border security, and create a path to citizenship for those living in the shadows. Tim delivered the Senate’s first ever floor speech in Spanish making the case for the comprehensive immigration reform bill.

Kaine has spoken out against the rise in deportations of law-abiding immigrants that are ripping families apart. Tim takes pride that the United States is a nation of immigrants. Since the nation’s founding, the men and women who have come to this country from around the world have been integral to our society, bringing skills and talents that help ensure we remain competitive in a global economy. In the years since Tim was born, Virginia went from ranking 35th to 12th in individual personal income, propelled in part by the influx of immigrants to our communities.

Tim has also been a leading voice in Congress on the importance of protecting Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients who are living in the U.S. after being displaced by dangerous conditions in their home countries. Tim has urged the Trump Administration to extend and re-designate TPS for several countries where threats still exist and to protect TPS recipients by giving them the opportunity to gain permanent residency in the United States.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure andTransportation

Tim supports major improvements to our nation’s infrastructure that would create jobs and improve daily life for families across Virginia. In the Senate, he has advocated for a robust infrastructure package that makes a significant federal investment to improve roads, bridges, rail (including Metro), water, and broadband. Tim has pushed for federal funding for transportation projects across the Commonwealth and has helped secure grants for major projects like the I-95 Atlantic Gateway multimodal project, a new interstate connector at Norfolk International Terminal, the long overdue replacement of the traffic-clogged Chesapeake Deep Creek Bridge, and rehabilitation of the I-64 Delta Frame Bridges. Tim has spoken out against President Trump’s infrastructure proposal, which puts the burden on already struggling local governments to cover large costs of projects with their own funds or by making many new highway projects toll roads. Virginia has serious transportation needs — like the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel, Metro, and I-81 — and Tim is disappointed President Trump’s plan skimps on real federal investments to support those needs. Tim has supported a $1 trillion infrastructure proposal that would make historic investments to modernize our crumbling infrastructure and, by some estimates, create more than 15 million jobs. Tim has also introduced legislation to expand skills training to ensure we have a workforce ready to fill the jobs to complete an infrastructure plan of this nature.

Tim recognizes how vital Metro is to Northern Virginia and has pushed for reforms to improve Metro safety and service while making sure the federal government lives up to its funding commitments. Tim has worked to strengthen federal safety oversight authority over Metro, leading bipartisan legislation to enact the Metro Safety Commission, a tough new safety oversight body with the legal authority to mandate long overdue safety and operational changes to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). In 2017, Tim played a key role in securing $227 million to fix the aging Arlington Memorial Bridge, a critical investment for Northern Virginia commuters and visitors to Virginia and Washington, D.C. that saved the bridge from closing.

Many states would consider themselves fortunate to have either a major international airport or a major international seaport, but Virginia is blessed with both. Making the Port of Virginia and Dulles International Airport all that they can be has been a top priority of Tim’s. He has worked to advance transformative projects at the Port like the Craney Island Eastward Expansion, which will nearly double its cargo capacity, and dredging of Norfolk Harbor to depths that will attract the largest post-Panamax container ships. He has also worked to secure federal funds through HUD and the Army Corps of Engineers for flood-resilient infrastructure to protect the Port, Naval Station Norfolk, and Hampton Roads from sea level rise and recurrent flooding. At Dulles, he has teamed up with the Virginia delegation to secure funds for more Customs and Border Protection officers that will reduce long lines at customs and security, and he has pushed back against changes to the Reagan National slot and perimeter rule policies that would negatively impact Dulles and could increase airplane noise in the neighborhoods surrounding National.

As Governor of Virginia, Tim made infrastructure investment a top priority. He played a key role in making Metro’s Silver Line to Dulles a reality and advanced critical projects like the Norfolk Tide light-rail system and Amtrak service to Lynchburg, which in 2017 was extended to Roanoke. Tim understands that these are the kinds of smart investments that help our economy grow and thrive. He will continue being a strong advocate for fixing our roads, bridges, and rail systems to create jobs, improve the daily lives of commuters, and fuel economic growth in the Commonwealth.

Safety

Preventing Gun Violence

Tim is a strong supporter of commonsense steps to reduce gun violence. In the Senate, he has been a leading voice calling on his colleagues to listen to the overwhelming majority of Americans and finally pass legislation that will make communities safer. He supports universal background checks and banning the sale, transfer, manufacture, and importation of combat-style weapons and high-capacity magazines to keep weapons of war off the streets and out of the nation’s schools. Tim has also co-sponsored legislation to hold gun manufacturers accountable and close loopholes that allow domestic abusers to legally obtain weapons. Tim supported changes that passed into law to strengthen the background record check system and allow the CDC to conduct research on gun violence, but he believes Congress must take further action.

As Governor, Tim helped strengthen the background record check system following the tragic shooting at Virginia Tech. As Mayor of Richmond, he helped bring down the city’s rate of gun violence and homicide. Tim has met with students, parents, and teachers across Virginia to listen to their concerns about gun violence, and he will continue calling for a real debate on legislation that addresses this epidemic.

Veterans

Veterans

Tim has made it a top priority in the Senate to support veterans, servicemembers, and their families. He’s been a leader on efforts to reduce unemployment for veterans and military spouses and ensure those who serve our nation receive the health care and benefits they were promised.

There is no state more closely connected to the military than Virginia. The map of the Commonwealth is rich with military history: Yorktown, Appomattox, the Pentagon, and more than 20 military installations. With nearly 800,000 veterans residing in the Commonwealth, Virginia has one of the highest state populations of veterans in America. Tim has fought to ensure veterans receive timely access to good health care and benefits. He has introduced legislation to improve veterans’ access to care, help Vietnam veterans harmed by Agent Orange, and address serious problems facing the Department of Veterans Affairs. He has also introduced a bill to address opioid overmedication that affects veterans struggling with pain medication so that they can receive safer, more effective pain management services through the VA.

The first piece of legislation Tim introduced in the Senate – the Troop Talent Act of 2013 – was a bill to ease the transition for servicemembers into the civilian workforce. After hearing from veterans across Virginia who could not get hired despite expertise they had gained through military training, Tim wrote this bipartisan bill to help address the challenge. The Troop Talent Act helped align the skills servicemembers acquired in the military with certifications or licenses to make it easier for them to be hired in the civilian workforce. Key provisions of the Troop Talent Act have been signed into law. Tim has also introduced legislation to improve the quality of educational programs for servicemembers and veterans to help them compete and succeed in the workforce after their service.

Tim believes Congress has a duty to support military families, who sacrifice so much for the nation. After meeting with military families across Virginia, Tim learned that one of the biggest concerns facing military spouses is the toll frequent moves and unexpected transfers have on a spouse’s ability to find work and maintain a career. Tim recognizes that this causes financial insecurity for families, hurting our troops’ ability to do their jobs. To help tackle the problem, Tim has introduced several bills—including the Military Spouse Employment Act and the Jobs and Childcare for Military Families Act—to reduce military spouse unemployment and support military families. Tim believes that by expanding hiring and career opportunities, improving access to continuing education programs, ensuring military families can find affordable child care, and providing better transition and employment resources for military spouses, Congress can better ensure the military is ready to accomplish its mission.

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Terry McAuliffeTerry McAullife

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Overview: N/A

About

Terry McAullife

Source: Wikipedia

Terry McAuliffe (born February 9, 1957) is an American politician and former entrepreneur who served as the 72nd Governor of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. He was chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 2001 to 2005, was co-chairman of President Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign, and was chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign.

McAuliffe was previously an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2009 gubernatorial election. In the 2013 gubernatorial election, he ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. He defeated Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Libertarian Robert Sarvis in the general election, collecting 47.8% of the vote; Cuccinelli garnered 45.2% and Sarvis received 6.5%. McAuliffe assumed office on January 11, 2014, and his term ended on January 13, 2018.

Family and education

McAuliffe was born and raised in Syracuse, New York, the son of Mildred Katherine Lonergan and Jack McAuliffe. His father was a real estate agent and local Democratic politician. The family is of Irish descent.

He graduated from Bishop Ludden Junior/Senior High School in 1975. In 1979, he earned a bachelor’s degree from The Catholic University of America, where he served as a resident adviser.After graduating, McAuliffe worked for President Jimmy Carter’s reelection campaign, becoming the national finance director at twenty-two. Following the campaign, McAuliffe attended theGeorgetown University Law Center, where he obtained his Juris Doctor degree in 1984.

Business career

At age of 14, McAuliffe started his first business,McAuliffe Driveway Maintenance, sealing driveways and parking lots. According toThe Washington Post, McAuliffe has “earned millions as a banker, real estate developer, home builder, hotel owner, and internet venture capitalist.”

In 1985, McAuliffe helped found the Federal City National Bank, a Washington, D.C.-based local bank. In January 1988, when McAuliffe was thirty years old, the bank’s board elected McAuliffe as chairman, making him the youngest chairman in the United States Federal Reserve Bank’s charter association. In 1991, McAuliffe negotiated a merger with Credit International Bank, which he called his “greatest business experience.”  McAuliffe became the vice-chairman of the newly merged bank. Shareholders questioned whether he was given special treatment; Chairman Richard V. Allen denied the allegation.

In 1979, McAuliffe had met Richard Swann, a lawyer who was in charge of fundraising for Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign inFlorida. In 1988, McAuliffe married Swann’s daughter, Dorothy. McAuliffe invested $800,000 in Swann’s American Pioneer Savings Bank, which was taken over In 1990 by federal regulators, causing Swann to file for bankruptcy. The Resolution Trust Corporation, a federal agency, took over American Pioneer’s assets and liabilities.[13] Under Swann’s guidance, McAuliffe purchased some of American Pioneer’s real estate from the Resolution Trust Corporation. McAuliffe’s equal partner in the deal was a pension fund controlled by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). They purchased real estate valued at $50 million for $38.7 million; McAuliffe received a 50% equity stake.  The deal was arranged by Jack Moore, a NECA trustee and acquaintance of McAuliffe.[13][15] Next, McAuliffe acquired a distressed house-building company, American Heritage Homes, which had been buying real estate formerly owned by American Pioneer.[13] McAuliffe served as chairman of American Heritage along with CEO Carl H. Linder. The Florida-based company came out of distress under a plan in which it built 800 homes a year.

In 1997, McAuliffe invested $100,000 in Global Crossing, a Bermuda-registered telecommunications company. Global Crossing went public in 1998. In 1999, McAuliffe sold the majority of his holding for $8.1 million.

In 2009, McAuliffe founded GreenTech Automotive, a holding company, which purchased Chinese electric car company EU Auto MyCar for $20 million in May 2010. Later that year, McAuliffe relocated GreenTech’s headquarters to McLean, Virginia. GreenTech subsequently announced plans to manufacture vehicles in Mississippi. In December 2012, McAuliffe was questioned about the factory’s location in Mississippi instead of Virginia. McAuliffe said he wanted to bring the factory to Virginia, but the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the commonwealth’s recruitment agency, chose not to bid on it. Documents showed the VEDP was awaiting more information at the time it was announced the factory was being built in Mississippi. In April 2013, McAuliffe announced his resignation from GreenTech to focus on his run for governor of Virginia. He no longer holds an ownership stake in the company.

Fundraising career and relationship with the Clintons

McAuliffe had a prolific fundraising career within the Democratic Party and a personal and political relationship with Bill and Hillary Clinton. McAuliffe and his staff raised $275 million, then an unprecedented sum, for Clinton’s causes while president. After Bill Clinton’s tenure ended, McAuliffe guaranteed the Clintons’ $1.35 million mortgage for their home in Chappaqua, New York. The deal raised ethical questions. In 2000, McAuliffe chaired a fundraiser with the Clintons, setting a fundraising record of $26.3 million.

McAuliffe told The New York Times in 1999, “I’ve met all of my business contacts through politics. It’s all interrelated.” When he meets a new business contact, he continued, “Then I raise money from them.” He acknowledged that success of his business dealings stemmed partly from his relationship with Bill Clinton, saying, “No question, that’s a piece of it.” He also credited his ties to former congressmen Dick Gephardt and Tony Coelho, his Rolodex of 5,000-plus names, and his ability to personally relate to people. In 2004, he was one of the five-member board of directors of the Clinton Foundation. He told New York Times reporter Mark Leibovich in 2012 that his Rolodex held 18,632 names.

Chairman of the Democratic National Committee

In June 2000, as organizers of the 2000 Democratic National Convention were scrambling to raise $7 million, convention chairmanRoy Romer resigned to become superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. McAuliffe immediately accepted appointment as Romer’s replacement when asked on a phone call by presumptive presidential nominee Al Gore. Already in the news for a record $26 million fundraiser with Bill Clinton the month prior, McAuliffe promised that money would be a “non-issue” for the convention, and that the outstanding $7 million would be raised “very quickly”. The selection of McAuliffe was praised by many in the party, and was widely seen to represent the growth in his influence, with James Carville telling the New York Times that “his stock is trading at an all-time high”.

In February 2001, McAuliffe was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and served until February 2005.McAuliffe tried and failed to persuade his top rival, Maynard Jackson, to drop out of the race for chairman but was still the heavy favorite. During his tenure, the DNC raised $578 million and emerged from debt for the first time in its history.

In the period between the 2002 elections and the 2004 Democratic convention, the DNC rebuilt operations and intra-party alliances. McAuliffe worked to restructure the Democratic primary schedule, allowing Arizona, New Mexico, North Carolina and South Carolinato vote earlier; the move provided African-American and Hispanic communities greater power in presidential primaries. According toThe Washington Post, the move bolstered United States Senator John Kerry’s fundraising efforts. The DNC rebuilt its headquarters and created a computer database of more than 170 million potential voters known as “Demzilla.” Five-time presidential candidateRalph Nader alleged that during the 2004 presidential election McAuliffe offered him cash to withdraw from certain pivotal states.McAuliffe’s staff admitted to conversations with Nader about his campaign but denied offering him money.

In January 2005, a few weeks before his term ended, McAuliffe earmarked $5 million of the party’s cash to assist Tim Kaine and other Virginia Democrats in their upcoming elections. This donation was the largest nonpresidential disbursement in DNC history, and was part of McAuliffe’s attempt to prove Democratic viability in Southern states in the wake of the 2004 presidential election. Kaine was successful in his bid, and served as the Governor of Virginia from 2006 to 2010.

Post-DNC chairmanship

McAuliffe was co-chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign and one of her superdelegates at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

In 2012, he was a visiting fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. In addition to several faculty and student lectures, McAuliffe hosted a segment entitled “The Making of a Candidate: From Running Campaigns to Running on my Own.”

McAuliffe was an adviser at ZeniMax Media.

Web

Schar Scool, Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia

Issues

Abortion

In 2013, McAuliffe said he supports “keeping existing Virginia laws on when abortions are legal.” He opposes new state health and safety regulations on abortion clinics

Impeachment

In August 2018, McAuliffe stated “that’s something we ought to look at”, referring to the impeachment of president Trump. He argued that if “President Obama had gone to Helsinki and done what President Trump had done, you would already have impeachment hearings going on”.

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Ralph Northam 5Ralph Northam

Current Position: Governor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor from 2014 – 2018; State Senator for VA Senate District 6 from 2008 – 2014

“Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service. He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.”

Source: Government page

An extraordinary reconvened session
Virginia Mercury, Bob JonesOctober 8, 2020 (Short)

Lawmakers delay minimum wage, maintain election schedule in extraordinary session

Protesters in cars honked endlessly as they circled the Capitol. The Speaker of the House collapsed on the dais as she led a floor session. A lawmaker cast votes from a Plexiglas enclosure.

The typically sleepy reconvened session of the Virginia General Assembly on Thursday fully reflected the bizarre world into which we’ve all been thrust by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“If anyone in this room is going to die from the virus if they get it, it’s me,” said Sen. George Barker, D-Fairfax, who worked from the transparent enclosure constructed by Senate staff. He said he was still recovering from open heart surgery and a bout of pneumonia.

Top News

An extraordinary reconvened session
Virginia Mercury, Bob JonesOctober 8, 2020 (Short)

Lawmakers delay minimum wage, maintain election schedule in extraordinary session

Protesters in cars honked endlessly as they circled the Capitol. The Speaker of the House collapsed on the dais as she led a floor session. A lawmaker cast votes from a Plexiglas enclosure.

The typically sleepy reconvened session of the Virginia General Assembly on Thursday fully reflected the bizarre world into which we’ve all been thrust by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“If anyone in this room is going to die from the virus if they get it, it’s me,” said Sen. George Barker, D-Fairfax, who worked from the transparent enclosure constructed by Senate staff. He said he was still recovering from open heart surgery and a bout of pneumonia.

Summary

Current Position: Governor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor from 2014 – 2018; State Senator for VA Senate District 6 from 2008 – 2014

“Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service. He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.”

Source: Government page

About

Ralph Northam 2

Source: Government page

Before he was inaugurated as the 73rd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam served as an Army doctor, pediatric neurologist, business owner, state Senator and Lieutenant Governor.

A native of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Governor Northam was educated at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), where he graduated with distinction.

After graduation, Governor Northam was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. He served eight years of active duty and rose to the rank of major.

He attended Eastern Virginia Medical School and then traveled to San Antonio for a pediatric residency, where he met his wife Pamela, a pediatric occupational therapist at the same hospital.  Governor Northam did his residencies at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and served as chief neurological resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital. As an Army doctor, he served in Germany, treating soldiers wounded in Operation Desert Storm.

When Governor Northam and Pamela returned home, they chose to build their life in Hampton Roads. He began practicing pediatric neurology at Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Norfolk. He established Children’s Specialty Group, his current medical practice, to provide expert pediatric care for patients. Governor Northam also served as assistant professor of neurology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, where he taught medicine and ethics.

Governor Northam volunteered as medical director for the Edmarc Hospice for Children in Portsmouth, where he spent 18 years caring for terminally ill children.

Governor Northam approaches public service with the same passion he brought to his military and medical service.  He is committed to working with leaders from both parties to build a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live.

Governor Northam is the first native of the Eastern Shore to serve as Governor since Governor Henry A. Wise took office 1856. He is also the first VMI Keydet to serve as Governor since Governor Westmoreland Davis took office in 1918.

Governor Northam and First Lady Pamela Northam have two adult children: Wes, a neurosurgical resident in Chapel Hill, and Aubrey, a web developer in Richmond.

Experience

Work Experience

  • pediatric neurologist
    Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Norfolk, Virginia.[
    1992 to present
  • medical officer
    United States Army
    1982 to 1984

Education

  • MD
    Eastern Virginia Medical School
    1984
  • BA
    Virginia Military Institute
    1981

Contact

Email:

Offices

Richmond Office
Virginia Governor
Ralph Northam
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-786-2211

Web

Government Page, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Prior to entering politics, Northam voted for Republican George W. Bush in the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections, a fact that opponents raised in later Democratic primaries. Northam says that he was apolitical at the time and regretted those votes, saying: “Politically, there was no question, I was underinformed.”

Virginia State Senate

Northam first ran for office in 2007 in the Virginia 6th Senate district, which includes the Eastern Shore of Virginia; Mathews County, on the Middle Peninsula; and parts of the cities of Norfolk and Virginia Beach. He was unopposed for the Democratic nomination. On November 6, 2007, he defeated Nick Rerras, a two-term Republican incumbent, 17,307 votes to 14,499.

He was re-elected in November 2011, defeating Ben Loyola Jr., a defense contractor, 16,606 votes to 12,622.

One of Northam’s first major activities as a state legislator was to lead an effort to pass a ban on smoking in restaurants in Virginia. The bill failed the first time, but was passed the next year and signed into law by Governor Tim Kaine.

In 2009, Northam—a self-described “conservative on fiscal issues and liberal on social issues” was the subject of an attempt by state Senate Republicans to get him to switch parties. This action would have given Republicans control of the State Senate, but after news of the imminent switch broke on Twitter, Democrats held a closed-door meeting, and Northam reiterated that he was not leaving the party. He later said, “I guess it’s nice to be wanted, but I’m a Democrat, and that’s where I’m staying.”

Lieutenant Governor of Virginia

Northam ran for lieutenant governor as Terry McAuliffe’s running mate.

Northam ran for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia in the 2013 election. Northam competed against U.S. Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra for the Democratic nomination. On June 11, 2013, Northam won the Democratic primary over Chopra with 54% of the vote to Chopra’s 46%.

On November 5, 2013, Northam was elected as Virginia’s 40th Lieutenant Governor over Republican E. W. Jackson by a 10% margin, receiving 55% of the vote to Jackson’s 45%.Northam was the first Democrat since Tim Kaine in 2001 to be elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia.

2017 gubernatorial election

In February 2015, just over a year into his term as lieutenant governor, Northam confirmed his interest in running for Governor of Virginia in 2017.  He made these intentions official on November 17, 2015, via an email to supporters.

Northam faced former congressman Tom Perriello in the Democratic primary. The primary campaign was seen as a proxy battle between the Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party, represented by Perriello, and the wing, represented by Northam. On June 13, 2017, Northam won the Democratic nomination with 56% of the vote to Perriello’s 44%. He faced Republican nominee Ed Gillespie in the general election.

Northam’s campaign funds were heavily depleted by the end of the primary race. He was left with around $1.75 million, which amounted to roughly half of Gillespie’s remaining funds. But by the end of summer 2017 Northam’s war chest had grown “twice as large [as Gillespie’s] heading into the last two months of the campaign, according to finance reports.” Northam led Gillespie among small donors, as well: “5,900 donations under $100 to Gillespie’s 2,100.”

In October 2017, the Northam campaign released a small number of flyers omitting Northam’s running-mate for Lieutenant Governor,Justin Fairfax. These were released at the request of Laborers’ International Union of North America, which had endorsed Northam (and Northam’s running mate for Attorney General, Mark Herring, who was included on the flyer), but not Fairfax. LIUNA explained that Fairfax opposes the construction of natural gas pipelines that are favored by the organization. As Fairfax is black, while Northam and Herring are both white, some activists criticized the decision to accommodate LIUNA’s request. All houses that received the LIUNA flyers also received standard campaign flyers including Fairfax.

During the campaign, Gillespie and President Donald Trump accused Northam of being responsible for the increased activities of theMS-13 gangs and of being “in favor of sanctuary cities that let dangerous illegal immigrants back on the streets.” Gillespie and Trump said that Northam had been the deciding vote to stop a Republican bill in the state Senate which would have banned sanctuary cities and that this contributed to the surge in MS-13 violence; a notion that FactCheck.org found to be “misleading”. TheWashington Post and CNN noted that there are no actual sanctuary cities in Virginia. Gillespie himself acknowledged that Virginia did not have sanctuary cities. The Washington Post furthermore noted that there is no evidence that sanctuary cities increase crime or gang activity, and that Virginia communities with higher immigrant populations have lower crime rates.

Later that month, the Latino Victory Fund, which supports Northam, released an ad in which a pickup truck, adorned with a Gillespie bumper sticker, a “Don’t tread on me” license plate, and a Confederate flag, chases down minority children and corners them in an alley—one of the children in the ad then wakes up, revealing the scene to have been a nightmare.[42][43] Although Northam and his campaign were not involved with the ad, Northam initially defended it, saying Gillespie’s own ads “have promoted fearmongering, hatred, bigotry, racial divisiveness,” and adding, “I mean, it’s upset a lot of communities, and they have the right to express their views as well.” The ad was pulled the following day in the hours after the terrorist attack in New York City, in which a man killed several people by running them over with a truck. Northam then distanced himself from the ad, re-emphasizing that it was not released by his campaign and saying that it is not one that he would have chosen to run. A spokesman for the campaign said that the Latino Victory Fund’s decision to pull the ad was “appropriate and the right thing to do.” FOX 5 DC reported that the Northam campaign had accepted $62,000 as an in-kind media contribution from the Latino Victory Fund.

In the final week of the campaign, Northam stated that he would as governor sign a bill to ban sanctuary cities in Virginia similar to a bill he had voted against in the state Senate earlier in 2017. In response, the progressive group Democracy for America stated that it stopped direct aid of Northam’s campaign. Howard Dean, who founded Democracy for America, but left the organization in 2016, wrote on Twitter that the organization had discredited itself and called its decision to stop aiding Northam’s campaign “incredibly stupid”. Democracy for America had already stopped collecting data for Northam and had ceased mentioning him in get-out-the-vote calls due to his campaign’s decision to remove Justin Fairfax from certain campaign fliers.

Northam held campaign rallies with former President Barack Obama and former Vice President Joe Biden during the general election campaign.

According to the Washington Post, Northam owns stock in several companies “doing extensive work in Virginia”. Northam has stated that if elected governor, he would place his financial investments into a blind trust, so as to avoid any potential conflicts of interest.

According to the Virginia Public Access Project, as of November 3, 2017, Northam has raised $33.8 million to Gillespie’s $24.5 million.

Northam was elected 73rd Governor of Virginia on November 7, 2017, defeating Ed Gillespie in the general election with a larger-than-expected nine-point margin of victory.

Governor of Virginia

Northam was sworn in as Governor of Virginia at noon on January 13, 2018 at the State Capitol. He became the second Eastern Shore native to serve as Governor of Virginia, after Henry A. Wise (who was elected in 1855) and the second alumnus of Virginia Military Institute to serve as governor, after Westmoreland Davis (who was elected in 1917). A majority of Northam’s cabinet secretaries are female, a first in Virginia history. Residents from every county in Virginia attended Northam’s inauguration (which reportedly marked another first for the state) and twenty-six groups participated in the inaugural parade, which has been called the largest and most diverse in state history.

Recent Elections

2017 Governor

Ralph Northam (D) 1,408,818 53.9%
Edward Walter Gillespie (R) 1,175,732 45.0%
Clifford Daniel Hyra (L) 27,987 1.1%
Write in (Write-in) 1,528 0.1%
TOTAL 2,614,065

2013 Lt. Governor

Ralph Northam (D) 1,213,155 55.1%
Earl Walker Jackson, Sr. (R) 980,257 44.5%
Write in (Write-in) 8,225 0.4%
TOTAL 2,201,637

2011 State Senator

Ralph Northam (D) 16,606 56.8%
Benito Loyola, Jr. (R) 12,622 43.1%
Write in (Write-in) 31 0.1%
TOTAL 29,259

Source: Department of Elections

Finances

NORTHAM, RALPH S has run in 4 races for public office, winning 4 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $41,626,149

Source: Follow the Money

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Source: Wikipedia

The Washington Post described Northam as a moderate state senator who moved to the left on some issues during the 2017 gubernatorial Democratic primary, such as support for a $15 minimum wage and opposition to a state constitutional amendment enshrining right-to-work legislation.

Civil Rights

Abortion

Northam supports abortion rights. In the Virginia General Assembly, he opposed a bill to mandate vaginal ultrasounds for women seeking abortions, and voted against the bill when it was revised to mandate only abdominal ultrasounds. He was endorsed in the 2017 Democratic gubernatorial primary by the abortion rights group NARALand its Virginia affiliate. Northam has argued for reducing abortion rates through education and expanding access to contraceptives.[126] Planned Parenthood pledged to spend $3 million supporting Northam in his 2017 general election campaign for governor. Northam opposes banning abortions after 20 weeks through a state version of the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.

For third-trimester abortions, Northam supports Virginia’s current law requiring certification by multiple physicians. During a January 2019 radio interview, Northam said that third-trimester abortions may be done in cases of a non-viable fetus or severe deformity. If a delivery occurred in such cases, Northam further stated that, “The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.” This statement drew intense criticism from Republican politicians nationwide, many of whom accused Northam of supporting infanticide

LGBTQ rights

Northam has supported LGBT rights throughout his political career. While running for lieutenant governor in 2013, he criticized his Republican opponent, E. W. Jackson, for making what were widely considered to be divisive statements about LGBT individuals. During a debate with Jackson, who is a minister, Northam said, “What I do in church translates to what I do in everyday life. Whether it’s said in my church or whether it’s said in my medical clinic or whether it’s said before the Senate, it’s on me and it’s what I believe in.” That summer, when the United States Defense Department began offering marriage benefits to military personnel in same-sex relationships, Northam and Jackson disagreed with each other on the issue. Jackson said that because gay marriage was illegal in Virginia at the time, the state should withhold benefits from gay couples serving in its National Guard, while Northam supported the federal policy. Northam said that equalizing benefits for gay couples in the United States military is about “being fair with those who have served our country.”

During the 2013 campaign, Northam said that opposition to LGBT rights would create an unwelcoming business environment in Virginia. In 2015, he used his tie-breaking abilities as lieutenant governor to defeat a bill in the state Senate that would have forced Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring to defend the state’s gay marriage ban; Herring had argued that the ban was unconstitutional.

In 2017, while running for governor, Northam spoke against the Physical Privacy Act, a bill proposed that year in Virginia, which if passed, would have required people in government facilities to use restrooms corresponding to the gender specified on their original birth certificates. Northam called the Physical Privacy Act a “job-killing, prejudicial bill”.[198] Later that same year, before Northam was elected governor, the Physical Privacy Act was defeated in the state legislature.

Northam condemned the decision by President Donald Trump to ban transgender service members from the United States military. Shortly after Trump announced this policy, Northam tweeted, “Anyone who wants to serve our country in the military should be welcomed. They’re patriots and should be treated as such.”

Northam’s first official action as governor was to sign an executive order banning the executive branch of the state government from discriminating against LGBTQ employees. The state of Virginia currently does not have any legislation protecting LGBTQ employees from employment discrimination. Protections on the bases of sexual orientation and gender identity that had been established through an executive order issued by Northam’s gubernatorial predecessor, Terry McAuliffe,[f] were maintained by Northam’s own executive order, which went further, introducing, for the first time in Virginia, protection on the basis of gender expression.

While serving as lieutenant governor, Northam broke a tie in the state Senate, supporting a bill that would have codified into state law the protections included in McAuliffe’s aforementioned executive order. This bill was defeated in the House of Delegates. If passed, it would have applied to all state and local government employees in Virginia; each anti-discrimination executive order issued by a Virginia governor has only applied to employees under the governor’s personal authority.[208][219]Legislation that would have codified Northam’s own executive order into state law passed the state Senate in 2018 and 2019, but failed both years to pass in the House of Delegates.

Marijuana

Northam favors decriminalizing marijuana.

Democracy

Redistricting

During his 2017 campaign for governor, Northam said that if elected, he would approve a map of new Virginia legislative and congressional boundaries in the post-2020 redistricting only if it is drawn by a nonpartisan commission.

Campaign and voting legislation

n January 2019, Northam introduced legislation including bills to end Virginia’s photo ID law and a bill to allow absentee “no-excuse” voting to replace the current law which contains limits. He is also proposing new campaign finance limits that would block direct donations from corporations, cap donations at $10,000, and prohibit the personal use of campaign funds by lawmakers.[

Economy

Northam supports increasing Virginia’s minimum wage, which at $7.25 an hour, has not surpassed the federally mandated level set in 2009.[152][153] While serving as lieutenant governor in 2014, Northam broke a tie in the Virginia state Senate, passing a bill that would have increased the state’s minimum wage by increments.[152][154][155]Under the bill, the state’s minimum wage would have settled at $9.25 an hour, after two years.[156] The measure was never enacted due to failing in the Virginia House of Delegates.[152][155][156] Three years later, as a gubernatorial candidate, Northam proposed that Virginia set its minimum wage at $15 an hour.[152][c] As governor, Northam plans to campaign against Republican state legislators who oppose a higher minimum wage.[152] Northam has pointed to the costliness of transportation in rural parts of the state to dispute the notion that a $15 minimum wage is too high for those areas.[157] During Northam’s first year as governor, he vetoed a bill passed by the Republican-controlled legislature that would have banned localized minimum wages for government contractors.[158]

During his 2017 campaign for governor, Northam was endorsed by the Laborers’ International Union of North America; the union praised Northam for his opposition to a “right-to-work” amendment to the Virginia state constitution.[159] Northam criticized the repeal of the car tax under former Governor Jim Gilmore because of its impact on both K-12 and higher education, saying Virginia still has not recovered.[160]

Northam “has called for phasing out the grocery tax on low-income people and ending business taxes in struggling rural areas.”[161] He has called for a bipartisan reform commission to make recommendations on state tax policy.

Education

Northam has proposed making it free for students to pursue a community college education or apprenticeship in a high-demand field (such as cybersecurity and early-childhood education) under the condition that they commit to a year of paid public service.[67]

Northam opposes public funding for private schools.

Environment

Environment and energy

Northam accepts the scientific consensus on climate change and as a candidate for governor vowed to lead efforts to fight climate change. He pledged, if elected, to bring Virginia into the United States Climate Alliance, a multi-state agreement to uphold greenhouse gas emissions standards. Northam has emphasized the negative effects of climate-change-induced sea level rise on Virginia’s Tidewater region.

During his 2017 campaign for governor, Northam pledged if elected to continue implementing the total maximum daily load limits for nitrogen and phosphorus discharges into Chesapeake Bay, a policy that had reduced harmful algal blooms. Northam said he would continue this policy even if the federal government under Donald Trump cut or eliminated funding for the program. During his campaign, Northam was endorsed by the Virginia League of Conservation Voters and the Virginia Sierra Club.

Northam has offered conditional support for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline, provided that the pipeline’s construction is deemed to be environmentally safe.[164][165] He has avoided taking a firm stance on other pipelines such as the Mountain Valley Pipeline.[166] He opposes both offshore drilling and fracking.

Northam has supported the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). In 2019, he vetoed a bill that would have prohibited Virginia from entering into the initiative, but in May 2019, he chose not to veto language in the state budget that prohibits spending related to the initiative, because under Virginia law, governors are generally not allowed to issue line-item vetoes of the state budget. According to The Washington Post, had Northam issued the veto, it could have been challenged in court by the Republican-controlled legislature, and Northam wanted to avoid a long legal confrontation. Northam has said that he will seek to implement RGGI spending in future budgets.

Health Care

Northam supports the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”), although he has argued that it is in need of improvement. After Republican attempts to repeal the law, Northam called for members of Congress to “put a stop to the uncertainty and work on stabilizing and building on the Affordable Care Act’s progress.”

Northam opposes a single-payer healthcare system in Virginia, preferring that such a plan be run by the federal government, but supports the creation of a state-run public health insurance option.[67]

On June 7, 2018, Northam signed a bipartisan bill expanding Medicaid in Virginia. This fulfilled one of his central campaign promises.[174][175] Northam’s gubernatorial predecessor, Terry McAuliffe, had tried throughout all four years of his own term in office to enact Medicaid expansion, but McAuliffe was never able to secure enough support from Republicans, who controlled the state legislature at the time. Following the 2017 election, which brought significant gains for Democrats in the Virginia House of Delegates, Republicans still held a narrow legislative majority; during this time however, opposition to Medicaid expansion diminished among Republicans, several of whom were willing to crossover in support of the bill. Once the bill was enacted on January 1, 2019, Virginia became the 33rd state to expand Medicaid and the first to do so since Louisiana in 2016. Enrollment in the expanded program began on November 1, 2018. By the beginning of 2019, more than 200,000 Virginians had enrolled in Medicaid as part of the expansion.

On February 21, 2019, Northam signed a bipartisan bill raising the smoking age in Virginia from eighteen to twenty-one.

Family leave and child care

When Northam was inaugurated as governor, the family leave policy for executive branch employees in the state of Virginia applied exclusively to employees who had given birth and offered only partial pay. In June 2018, Northam signed an executive order extending the policy to apply to both mothers and fathers, including not only biological parents but also adoptive and foster parents. Under the new policy, employees receive eight weeks off at full pay.[168] Earlier in the year, Republican Speaker of the House of Delegates Kirk Cox had established a similar policy offering legislative branch employees twelve weeks of paid leave.

With regards to private sector employees, Northam has said that he wants to implement tax credits for small businesses that offer paid family leave.

In 2018, Northam formed a commission to study the possibility of offering child care to state employees in Richmond. Northam’s wife, Pam, serves on the panel.[

Immigration

In his 2007 campaign for state Senate, Northam “advocated for Virginia being ‘even more stringent than we are now in fighting illegal immigration,’ and said the state should act as ‘strong partners’ with federal law enforcement.” Northam’s rhetoric shifted in his 2017 gubernatorial campaign. In 2017 Northam pledged to “stand up against ICE” so that “people, especially immigrants, in Virginia aren’t living in fear,” saying: “Something that we are very proud of in Virginia is that we are inclusive.” He continued by saying “We will do everything we can to make sure immigrants are comfortable living here.” Northam opposed President Trump’s decision to rescind Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which offered temporary stay for unauthorized immigrants who came to the United States as minors. Northam said Trump’s “decision lacks compassion, lacks moral sense, and lacks economic sense.” Northam supports granting state driver’s licenses and in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants.

In February 2017, Northam cast a tie-breaking vote in the state Senate against a bill to ban sanctuary cities in Virginia. Northam said he was “proud to break a tie when Republicans tried to scapegoat immigrants for political gain” and that he was “glad to put a stop to” the bill. In an October 2017 debate, Northam said he did not support sanctuary cities, stating that there currently were none in Virginia, but Northam declined to say whether he would sign a bill as governor that was similar to the one he voted against in the Senate. In November 2017, Northam clarified that while he would veto any bill pre-emptively banning sanctuary cities in Virginia, he would support a ban, if sanctuary cities began appearing in the state. In April 2018, as governor, Northam vetoed a law that would have pre-emptively banned sanctuary cities in Virginia. He vetoed the same legislation again the following year.

Safety

Criminal justice

During Virginia’s 2017 gubernatorial campaign, both Northam and his opponent, Ed Gillespie, called for the state’s felony threshold on theft to be raised, which at $200, was then tied with New Jersey for lowest in the nation.[140][141] Set in 1980, the threshold’s value would have been equal to around $600 in 2017, if it had kept pace with inflation.[142] Outgoing governor Terry McAuliffe had attempted, during his final year in office, to raise the threshold to $500, but was unable to advance such a proposal through the legislature.[143][144] Both McAuliffe and Northam supported raising the threshold even further to $1,000,[141] which would have been more closely aligned with those found in a majority of other states,[142] while Gillespie approved of a $500 threshold.[145] Following Northam’s election to the governorship, The Washington Postidentified this issue as an opportunity for bipartisan legislation.[146]

In early February 2018, about a month after his inauguration as governor, Northam struck a deal with the Republican-controlled legislature to raise the felony threshold to $500; in exchange, Northam gave support to Republican-sponsored legislation that would require criminal defendants seeking parole to first pay full restitution to victims.[142][147] McAuliffe had vetoed a comparable restitution bill the previous year. The Washington Post’s editorial board called Northam’s compromise “a small step toward fairer justice in Virginia”, but voiced concern that the restitution bill would place an onerous burden on poor defendants; the editorial board also noted that the $500 threshold is still one of the country’s lowest and still, when adjusted for inflation, under the level that had been set in 1980.[147]

As governor, Northam signed into law a bill imposing a new mandatory minimum sentence for those who are convicted of murdering a police officer. Later during his term, in May 2019, he vowed against signing any further legislation imposing mandatory minimum sentences. In an op-ed for The Washington Post, he argued that such legislation is racially discriminatory and leads to over-incarceration.

Death penalty

Ralph Northam opposes the death penalty.

Guns

According to The Washington Post, Northam favors the “reinstatement of Virginia’s ‘one-gun-a-month’ law limiting purchases, as well as a ban on high-capacity magazines and assault weapons.

Confederate monuments

On the controversies over public monuments to the Confederacy, in June 2017 Northam stated that the statues in the state Capitol that the General Assembly has jurisdiction over “should be taken down and moved into museums”, and that the decision on other statues “belongs to local communities.” He has said that there should be more public memorials to historical Virginia civil rights leaders such as Barbara Rose Johns, Oliver Hill, and Samuel Wilbert Tucker. In August 2017, Northam took a firmer stance, saying, “I believe these statues should be taken down and moved into museums. As governor, I am going to be a vocal advocate for that approach and work with localities on this issue.”[137] Northam later reverted to his original stance that decisions on the monuments should be made locally.

Donald Trump

In a political commercial called “Listening”, run during the Virginia Democratic primary, Northam described the importance to him of listening – as a doctor, to his patients and as lieutenant governor, to his constituents. He ended with, “I’ve been listening carefully to Donald Trump, and I think he’s a narcissistic maniac.” As the general election drew near Northam said, “[I]f Donald Trump is helping Virginia, I’ll work with him.” Northam explained the “softer tone”: “I think people already know [their opinions of Trump] and they are judging for themselves. What we are talking about as we move forward are the policies that are coming out of Washington that are so detrimental to Virginia”

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Governor of VirginiaGovernor of Virginia

The Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. The current holder of the office is Democrat Ralph Northam, who was sworn in on January 13, 2018.

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as "The Honorable", but may occasionally be referred to as "Excellency" if ceremonially appropriate.

Summary

Candidates for governor must be United States citizens who have resided in Virginia and been a registered voter for five years prior to the election in which they are running. The candidates must be at least 30 years of age.

Unlike other state governors, Virginia governors are not allowed to serve consecutive terms.  To get on the ballot for Governor of Virginia, each candidate must file 10 000 signatures, including the signatures of at least 400 qualified voters from each 11 congressional districts in the Commonwealth.

The Governor of Virginia is addressed as “The Honorable”, but may occasionally be referred to as “Excellency” if ceremonially appropriate.

Duties

From Wikipedia

The governor is the head of government in Virginia. At the beginning of every regular session, they must report the state of the Commonwealth to the Virginia General Assembly (both the House of Delegates and the Senate). They must convene the legislature when two-thirds of each house calls for a special session. The governor must ensure that the laws of the Commonwealth are faithfully executed by either signing, or allowing it to come into law, or vetoing, not allowing it to become law. They are responsible for the safety of the state, as they serve as commander-in-chief of the Virginia Militia.

Powers

From Wikipedia

  • The governor has the legislative power to submit recommendations and to call special sessions when he finds them necessary.
  • The governor has veto powers. All bills must be sent to the governor before becoming law. The governor may sign the bill, let it sit unsigned for seven days, after which it becomes law, or veto the legislation. After a veto, the bill returns to its house of origin and may be overridden by two-thirds of the vote in each house.
  • The governor also has the power to use a line-item veto. He may send legislation back to the legislature with recommendations and amendments. The legislature must either approve the changes by a majority in each house or override the veto with a two-thirds majority in each house.
  • The governor is commander-in-chief of Virginia’s militia forces.
  • The governor may also communicate with other states and foreign powers.
  • The governor has the power to fill vacancies in positions unless the position is appointed by the legislature.
  • The governor may commute fines or sentences and issue pardons. The governor may also restore voting rights and overturn other political penalties on individuals.

History

From Wikipedia

The position of Governor of Virginia dates back to the 1607 first permanent English settlement in America, at Jamestown on the north shore of the James River upstream from Hampton Roads harbor at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The Virginia Company of London set up a government run by a council. The president of the council basically served as a governor. The council was based in London and controlled the colony from afar. Nominally, Thomas Smith was the first president of the council, but he never left England. Edward Maria Wingfield was the first president of the council in residence in the new province, making him the first to exercise the actual authority of governing Virginia. The Virginia Company soon abandoned governance by council two years after the landing on May 23, 1609, and replacing it with a governor, the famous and dynamic leader, John Smith (1580-1631).

In 1624, the English Monarchy of King James I (1566-1625, reigned 1603-1625), in the last year of his reign, of the royal House of Stuart took control from the Virginia Company and its stockholders and made Virginia a crown colony. Governors continued to be appointed by the monarch for many years. Most often, the appointed governor would reside in England while a deputy or lieutenant governor actually exercised authority. Royal rule was interrupted during the English Civil War (1642-46 / 1648-49), after which governors were appointed by the Protectorate under Richard Cromwell (successor to Oliver Cromwell) in the interim Commonwealth of England until the English Restoration of the monarchy with King Charles II in 1660.

Commonwealth

Virginia became an independent sovereign state and Commonwealth during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), with Patrick Henry(1736-1799, served 1776-79 / 1786-89) as its first governor (and also later sixth). From the Revolution until 1851, the governor was elected by the General Assembly of Virginia (commonwealth/state legislature). After 1851, in a democratic trend spreading across the Union, the state turned to popular elections for office holders.

During the American Civil War (1861-1865), Francis Harrison Pierpont was the governor of the Union-controlled parts of the state, later of which emerged the new state in the northwest of West Virginia. Pierpont also served as one of the provisional governors during the post-war Reconstruction era. These governors were appointed by the Federal government of the President and U.S. Congress, both controlled by Radical Republicans for a decade. In 1874, Virginia regained its right to self-governance and elected James L. Kemper (1823-1895), a Democrat and temporary Conservative Party member and former Confederate general as governor. After the Radical Republican appointees of the post-war Reconstruction era, Virginia would not actually elect another regular Republican as governor until A. Linwood Holton Jr. in 1969. However, in 1881 William E. Cameron was elected governor under the banner of the Readjuster Party, a coalition of Republicans and populist Democrats. Douglas Wilder became the first elected and only the second African American Governor of any U.S. state. He served as governor from 1990 to 1994.

Since 1851, Virginia’s gubernatorial elections have been held in “off-years”—years in which there are no national (presidential, senatorial, or House) elections; Virginia’s gubernatorial elections are held one year after U.S. presidential elections (2001, 2005, 2009, etc.) (Most states hold gubernatorial elections either on presidential-election years or midterm-election years, when there are congressional elections.) In every Virginia gubernatorial election starting with 1977, the governor elected had been from the opposite party as the president elected by the nation in the previous year, even when Virginia had voted for the president in office, as with Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. The only exception being in 2013 with the election of Democrat Terry McAuliffe, following the re-election of President Obama in 2012.

Tim Kaine was inaugurated on January 14, 2006. Due to renovations on the Capitol in Richmond, his inauguration was held in Williamsburg, making him the first governor to be inaugurated in Williamsburg since Thomas Jefferson in 1779. The current governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam, who was inaugurated on January 13, 2018.

List of Governors

# Picture Governor Took office Left office
1 Patrick henry.JPG Patrick Henry July 5, 1776 June 1, 1779
2 T Jefferson by Charles Willson Peale 1791 2.jpg Thomas Jefferson June 1, 1779 June 3, 1781
3 No image.svg William Fleming June 3, 1781 June 12, 1781
4 Thomas Nelson (1700s).jpg Thomas Nelson, Jr. June 12, 1781 November 22, 1781
No image.svg David Jameson November 22, 1781 December 1, 1781
5 Benharrv.JPG Benjamin Harrison V December 1, 1781 December 1, 1784
6 Patrick henry.JPG Patrick Henry December 1, 1784 December 1, 1786
7 EdmundRandolph.jpeg Edmund Randolph December 1, 1786 December 1, 1788
8 No image.svg Beverley Randolph December 1, 1788 December 1, 1791
9 HenryLee.jpeg Henry Lee III December 1, 1791 December 1, 1794
10 Robert Brooke Virginia Governor.jpg Robert Brooke December 1, 1794 December 1, 1796
11 No image.svg James Wood December 1, 1796 December 1, 1799
No image.svg Hardin Burnley December 7, 1799 December 11, 1799
No image.svg John Pendleton, Jr. December 11, 1799 December 19, 1799
12 James Monroe White House portrait 1819.jpg James Monroe December 19, 1799 December 1, 1802
13 John Page Rosewell Gloucester County Virginia.jpg John Page December 1, 1802 December 7, 1805
14 William Cabell.gif William H. Cabell December 7, 1805 December 1, 1808
15 John Tyler Sr.jpg John Tyler, Sr. December 1, 1808 January 15, 1811
George William Smith.jpg George William Smith January 15, 1811 January 19, 1811
16 James Monroe White House portrait 1819.jpg James Monroe January 19, 1811 April 3, 1811
17 George William Smith.jpg George William Smith April 3, 1811 December 26, 1811
N/A Peyton Randolph Virginia Governor.jpg Peyton Randolph December 27, 1811 January 3, 1812
18 BarbourT.jpg James Barbour January 3, 1812 December 1, 1814
19 Wilson Cary Nicholas 2.jpg Wilson Cary Nicholas December 1, 1814 December 1, 1816
20 James Patton Preston.jpg James Patton Preston December 1, 1816 December 1, 1819
21 Thomas Mann Randolph.jpg Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. December 1, 1819 December 1, 1822
22 James Pleasants bioguide.jpg James Pleasants December 1, 1822 December 10, 1825
23 Tyler Daguerreotype crop (restoration).jpg John Tyler December 10, 1825 March 4, 1827
24 William Branch Giles.jpg William Branch Giles March 4, 1827 March 4, 1830
25 John Floyd crop.jpg John Floyd March 4, 1830 March 31, 1834
26 LWTzw.jpg Littleton Waller Tazewell March 31, 1834 April 30, 1836
Wyndhamrobertsonportrait.jpg Wyndham Robertson April 30, 1836 March 31, 1837
27 David Campbell.jpg David Campbell March 31, 1837 March 31, 1840
28 Thomas Gilmer newer.jpeg Thomas Walker Gilmer March 31, 1840 March 20, 1841
John Mercer Patton.jpg John M. Patton March 20, 1841 March 31, 1841
John Rutherford Virginia Governor.jpg John Rutherfoord March 31, 1841 March 31, 1842
John Munford Gregory.jpg John Munford Gregory March 31, 1842 January 1, 1843
29 James McDowell.jpg James McDowell January 1, 1843 January 1, 1846
30 Hon. Smith - NARA - 528722.jpg William Smith January 1, 1846 January 1, 1849
31 John Buchanan Floyd.jpg John B. Floyd January 1, 1849 January 16, 1852
32 Joseph Johnson.png Joseph Johnson January 16, 1852 January 1, 1856
33 HAWise.jpg Henry A. Wise January 1, 1856 January 1, 1860
34 JohnLetcher.jpg John Letcher January 1, 1860 January 1, 1864
35 Extra Billy Smith-Virginia.jpg William Smith January 1, 1864 May 9, 1865
Francis Pierpont portrait.gif Francis Harrison Pierpont May 9, 1865 April 4, 1868
Henry Wells.jpg Henry H. Wells April 4, 1868 September 21, 1869
36 Gilbert Carlton Walker.gif Gilbert Carlton Walker September 21, 1869 January 1, 1874
37 James L Kemper.jpg James L. Kemper January 1, 1874 January 1, 1878
38 Frederick Holliday.jpg Frederick W. M. Holliday January 1, 1878 January 1, 1882
39 WE Cameron.jpg William E. Cameron January 1, 1882 January 1, 1886
40 Fitzhugh Lee Governor.jpg Fitzhugh Lee January 1, 1886 January 1, 1890
41 Philip McKinney.jpg Philip W. McKinney January 1, 1890 January 1, 1894
42 Charles O'Ferrall.jpg Charles Triplett O’Ferrall January 1, 1894 January 1, 1898
43 James Hoge Tyler.jpg James Hoge Tyler January 1, 1898 January 1, 1902
44 Andrew J. Montague.jpg Andrew Jackson Montague January 1, 1902 February 1, 1906
45 CASwanson.jpg Claude A. Swanson February 1, 1906 February 10, 1910
46 William Hodges Mann, ca. 1914.jpg William Hodges Mann February 10, 1910 February 1, 1914
47 H.C. Stuart.jpg Henry Carter Stuart February 1, 1914 February 1, 1918
48 Governorwestmdavis.jpg Westmoreland Davis February 1, 1918 February 1, 1922
49 GovTrinkle.jpg Elbert Lee Trinkle February 1, 1922 February 1, 1926
50 Harry F. Byrd.jpg Harry F. Byrd February 1, 1926 January 15, 1930
51 JGPollard.jpg John Garland Pollard January 15, 1930 January 17, 1934
52 GeorgeCPeery.jpg George C. Peery January 17, 1934 January 15, 1938
53 JamesHPrice.jpg James H. Price January 15, 1938 January 21, 1942
54 Colgate W. Darden (Virginia Governor).jpg Colgate Darden January 21, 1942 January 16, 1946
55 William M. Tuck.jpg William M. Tuck January 16, 1946 January 18, 1950
56 John S. Battle.jpg John S. Battle January 18, 1950 January 20, 1954
57 Thomas Bahnson Stanley.jpg Thomas B. Stanley January 20, 1954 January 11, 1958
58 James Lindsay Almond - circa 1945 to 1949 - US House of Representatives.jpg J. Lindsay Almond January 11, 1958 January 13, 1962
59 Albertis S. Harrison, Jr. 1962.jpg Albertis Harrison January 13, 1962 January 15, 1966
60 Mills Godwin 1966.jpg Mills Godwin January 15, 1966 January 17, 1970
61 Linwood Holton 1970.jpg Linwood Holton January 17, 1970 January 12, 1974
62 Mills Godwin 1974.jpg Mills Godwin January 12, 1974 January 14, 1978
63 John Dalton 1976.jpg John Dalton January 14, 1978 January 16, 1982
64 Charles Robb 1980.jpg Chuck Robb January 16, 1982 January 18, 1986
65 Gerald Baliles 1986.jpg Gerald Baliles January 18, 1986 January 13, 1990
66 D.Wilder S.Senate poster (cropped).jpg Douglas Wilder January 13, 1990 January 15, 1994
67 George Allen.jpg George Allen January 15, 1994 January 17, 1998
68 Jim Gilmore 2004 NSTAC crop.jpg Jim Gilmore January 17, 1998 January 12, 2002
69 Mark Warner.jpg Mark Warner January 12, 2002 January 14, 2006
70 Gov. Tim Kaine (cropped).jpg Tim Kaine January 14, 2006 January 16, 2010
71 Bob McDonnell by Gage Skidmore.jpg Bob McDonnell January 16, 2010 January 11, 2014
72 Virginia Governor Democrats Terry McAuliffe 095 Cropped.jpg Terry McAuliffe January 11, 2014 January 13, 2018
73 Governor Ralph Northam Gives Inaugural Address (39348612584) (cropped).jpg Ralph Northam January 13, 2018 Incumbent

 

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Mark Warner

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 US Senator
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006

Overview: N/A

About

Mark Warner

Source: Government page

Senator Warner was elected to the U.S. Senate in November 2008 and reelected to a second term in November 2014. He serves on the Senate Finance, Banking, Budget, and Rules Committees as well as the Select Committee on Intelligence, where he is the Vice Chairman. During his time in the Senate, Senator Warner has established himself as a bipartisan leader who has worked with Republicans and Democrats alike to cut red tape, increase government performance and accountability, and promote private sector innovation and job creation. Senator Warner has been recognized as a national leader in fighting for our military men and women and veterans, and in working to find bipartisan, balanced solutions to address our country’s debt and deficit.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

The first in his family to graduate from college, Mark Warner spent 20 years as a successful technology and business leader in Virginia before entering public office. An early investor in the cellular telephone business, he co-founded the company that became Nextel and invested in hundreds of start-up technology companies that created tens of thousands of jobs.

Senator Warner, his wife Lisa Collis, and their three daughters live in Alexandria, Virginia.

From Wikipedia

Prior to his congressional career, Warner was the 69th Governor of Virginia holding the office from 2002 to 2006, and is the honorary chairman of the Forward Together PAC. Warner delivered the keynote address at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Apart from politics, Warner is also known for his involvement in telecommunications-related venture capital during the 1980s; he founded the firm Columbia Capital.

In 2006, he was widely expected to pursue the Democratic nomination in the 2008 U.S. presidential elections; however, he announced in October 2006 that he would not run, citing a desire not to disrupt his family life. Warner was considered to be a potential vice presidential candidate, until he took himself out of consideration after winning the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate.

Contested by his gubernatorial predecessor, Jim Gilmore, Warner won his first election to the Senate in 2008 with 65% of the vote. Warner won reelection to the seat in 2014, defeating Ed Gillespie, who had previously served as Counselor to the President underGeorge W. Bush and chairman of the Republican National Committee. Warner’s margin of victory—only 17,000 votes—was much narrower than expected.

Early life, education, and business career

Warner was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, the son of Marjorie (née Johnston) and Robert F. Warner. He has a younger sister, Lisa. He grew up in Illinois, and later inVernon, Connecticut, where he graduated from Rockville High School, a public secondary school. He has credited his interest in politics to his eighth grade social studies teacher, Jim Tyler, who “inspired him to work for social and political change during the tumultuous year of 1968.” He was class president for three years at Rockville High School and hosted a weekly pick-up basketball game at his house, “a tradition that continues today.”

Warner graduated from George Washington University, (GW), earning his B.A. in 1977 with a 4.0 GPA and a minor in political science. He was valedictorian of his class at GW and the first in his family to graduate from college. At GW he worked on Capitol Hill to pay for his tuition, riding his bike early mornings to the office of U.S. Senator Abraham Ribicoff (D-CT). When his parents visited him at college, he obtained two tickets for them to tour the White House; when his father asked him why he didn’t get a ticket for himself, he replied, “I’ll see the White House when I’m president.”

Warner then graduated from Harvard Law School with a Juris Doctor in 1980 and coached the law school’s first intramural women’s basketball team. Warner has never practiced law. In the early 1980s, he served as a staffer to U.S. Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT). He later used his knowledge of federal telecommunication law and policies as a broker of mobile phone franchise licenses, making a significant fortune. As founder and managing director of Columbia Capital, a venture capital firm, he helped found or was an early investor in a number of technology companies, including Nextel. He co-founded Capital Cellular Corporation, and built up an estimated net worth of more than $200 million. As of 2012, he was the wealthiest U.S. Senator.

State activism

Warner involved himself in public efforts related to health care, telecommunications, information technology and education. He managed Douglas Wilder’s successful 1989 gubernatorial campaign and served as chairman of the state Democratic Party from 1993-95. He created four investment funds across Virginia and donated millions to charity, which he later touted in political campaigns.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Founder and managing director of a venture capital firm.
    Columbia Capital,
  • Co-Founder
    Capital Cellular Corporation

Education

  • BA
    George Washington University
    1977
  • JD
    George Washington University
    1980

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C.
703 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-2023

Abingdon
180 West Main Street
Abingdon, VA 24210
Phone: 276-628-8158

Norfolk
101 W. Main Street
Suite 7771
Norfolk, VA 23510
Phone: 757-441-3079

Richmond
919 E. Main Street
Suite 630
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: 804-775-2314

Vienna
8000 Towers Crescent Drive
Suite 200
Vienna, Virginia 22182
Phone: 703-442-0670

Web

Campaign Site, Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

1996 U.S. Senate election

He unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 1996 against incumbent Republican John Warner (no relation) in a “Warner versus Warner” election. Mark Warner performed strongly in the state’s rural areas, making the contest much closer than many pundits expected.He lost to the incumbent, 52%-47%, losing most parts of the state including the north.

Governor of Virginia

2001 election

Then-Gov. Mark Warner as the state commander in chief of theVirginia Army National Guard andVirginia Air National Guard

In 2001 Warner campaigned for governor as a moderate Democrat after years of slowly building up a power base in rural Virginia, particularly Southwest Virginia. He defeated Republican candidate Mark Earley, the state attorney general, in a “Mark versus Mark” election, with 52.16 percent, a margin of 96,943 votes, and also Libertarian candidate William B. Redpath. Warner had a significant funding advantage, spending $20 million compared with Earley’s $10 million.

Warner also benefited from dissension in Republican ranks after a heated battle for the nomination between Earley, backed by religious conservatives, and then-lieutenant governorJohn H. Hager, some of whose supporters later openly backed Warner. In the same election, Republican Jerry Kilgore was elected attorney general, and Democrat Tim Kaine was elected lieutenant governor. In his campaign for governor in 2001, Warner said that he would not raise taxes.

Tenure

After he was elected in 2002, Warner drew upon a $900 million “rainy day fund” left by his predecessor, James S. Gilmore, III.Warner campaigned in favor of two regional sales tax increases (Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads) to fund transportation. Virginians rejected both regional referendums to raise the sales tax.

In 2004, Warner worked with Democratic and moderate Republican legislators and the business community to reform the tax code, lowering food and some income taxes while increasing the sales and cigarette taxes. His tax package effected a net tax increase of approximately $1.5 billion annually. Warner credited the additional revenues with saving the state’s AAA bond rating, held at the time by only five other states, and allowing the single largest investment in K-12 education in Virginia history. Warner also entered into an agreement with Democrats and moderate Republicans in the Virginia Senate to cap state car tax reimbursements to local governments.

During his tenure as governor, Warner influenced the world of college athletics. “Warner used his power as Virginia’s governor in 2003 to pressure the Atlantic Coast Conference into revoking an invitation it had already extended to Syracuse University. Warner wanted the conference, which already included the University of Virginia, to add Virginia Tech instead — and he got his way.”

Warner’s popularity may have helped Democrats gain seats in the Virginia House of Delegates in 2003 and again in 2005, reducing the majorities built up by Republicans in the 1990s. Warner chaired theNational Governors Association in 2004-05 and led a national high school reform movement. He chaired the Southern Governors’ Association and was a member of the Democratic Governors Association. In January 2005, a two-year study,[12] the Government Performance Project, in conjunction with Governingmagazine and the Pew Charitable Trust graded each state in four management categories: money, people, infrastructure and information. Virginia and Utah received the highest ratings average with both states receiving an A- rating overall, prompting Warner to dub Virginia “the best managed state in the nation.”

Kaine and Kilgore both sought to succeed Warner as governor of Virginia. (The Virginia Constitution forbids any governor from serving consecutive terms; so Warner could not have run for a second term in 2005.) On November 8, 2005, Kaine, the former mayor of Richmond, won with 52% of the vote. Kilgore, who had resigned as attorney general in February 2005 to campaign full-time and who had previously served as Virginia secretary of public safety, received 46% of the vote. Russ Potts, a Republican state senator, also ran for governor as an independent, receiving 2% of the vote. Warner had supported and campaigned for Kaine, and many national pundits considered Kaine’s victory to be further evidence of Warner’s political clout in Virginia.

On November 29, 2005, Warner commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt to life imprisonmentwithout the possibility of parole. Lovitt was convicted of murdering Clayton Dicks at an Arlington pool hall in 1999. After his trial in 2001, Lovitt’s lawyers stated that a court clerk illegally destroyedevidence that was used against Lovitt during his trial, but that could have possibly exonerated him upon further DNA testing. Lovitt’s death sentence would have been the 1,000th carried out in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment as permissible under the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution in 1976. In a statement, Warner said, “The actions of an agent of the commonwealth, in a manner contrary to the express direction of the law, comes at the expense of a defendant facing society’s most severe and final sanction.” Warner denied clemency in 11 other death penalty cases that came before him as governor.

Warner also arranged for DNA tests of evidence left from the case of Roger Keith Coleman, who was put to death by the state in 1992. Coleman was convicted in the 1981 rape and stabbing death of his 19-year-old sister-in-law, Wanda McCoy. Coleman drew national attention, even making the cover of Time, by repeatedly claiming innocence and protesting the unfairness of the death penalty. DNA results announced on January 12, 2006 confirmed Coleman’s guilt.

In July 2005, his approval ratings were at 74% and in some polls reached 80%.[17] Warner left office with a 71% approval rating in one poll.

U.S. Senate

2008 election

Warner was believed to be preparing to run for the Democratic nomination for president in 2008, and had “done everything but announce his candidacy” before suddenly stating in October 2006 he would not run for president, citing family reasons. Warner declared on September 13, 2007 that he would run for the U.S. Senate being vacated by the retiring John Warner (no relation) in 2008.

Warner delivers the keynote address during the second day of the2008 Democratic National Conventionin Denver, Colorado.

Warner immediately gained the endorsement of most national Democrats. He held a wide lead over his Republican opponent, fellow former Virginia governor Jim Gilmore, for virtually the entire campaign. Warner delivered the keynote address at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

In a Washington Post/ABC News Poll dated September 24, 2008, Warner held a 30-point lead over Gilmore.

In the November election, Warner defeated Gilmore, taking 65 percent of the vote to Gilmore’s 34 percent. Warner carried all but four counties in the state—Rockingham,Augusta, Powhatan and Hanover. In many cases, he ran up huge margins in areas of the state that have traditionally voted Republican. This was the most lopsided margin for a contested Senate race in Virginia since Chuck Robb took 72 percent of the vote in 1988. As a result of Warner’s victory, Virginia had two Democratic U.S. Senators for the first time sinceHarry Byrd, Jr. left the Democrats to become an independent (while still caucusing with the Democrats) in 1970.

Tenure

Upon arriving in the U.S. Senate in 2009, Warner was appointed to the Senate’s Banking, Budget, and Commerce committees. Warner was later named to the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2011.

In 2009, Warner voted for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the stimulus bill. As a member of the Budget Committee, he submitted an amendment designed to help the government track how the stimulus dollars were being spent.

When offered the chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in preparation for the 2012 election cycle, Warner declined because he wanted to keep a distance from the partisanship of the role.

In the fall of 2012, Warner was approached by supporters about possibly leaving the Senate to seek a second four-year term as Virginia’s governor. After considering the prospect, Warner announced shortly after the November 2012 elections that he had chosen to remain in the Senate because he was “all in” on finding a bipartisan solution to the country’s fiscal challenges.

Warner became the senior senator on January 3, 2013 when Jim Webb left the Senate and was replaced by Tim Kaine, who was lieutenant governor while Warner was governor.[

In 2014, Ed Gillespie criticized him for using tax payer money to fly in a luxury airplane.

Warner was ranked as the 10th most bipartisan member of the U.S. Senate during the 114th United States Congress (and the third most bipartisan member of the U.S. Senate from theAmerican South after West Virginia Senators Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito) in the Bipartisan Index created by The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy that ranks members of the United States Congress by their degree of bipartisanship (by measuring the frequency each member’s bills attract co-sponsors from the opposite party and each member’s co-sponsorship of bills by members of the opposite party). Likewise, Warner has been identified as a radical centrist, working to foster compromise in the Senate.

Recent Elections

2014 US Senator

Mark Warner (D) 1,073,667 49.1%
Edward Walter Gillespie (R) 1,055,940 48.3%
Robert Christopher Sarvis (L) 53,102 2.4%
Write In () 1,811 .1%
TOTAL 2,184,520

2008 US Senator

Mark Warner (D) 2,369,327 65.0%
James Jim S. Gilmore, III (R) 1,228,830 33.7%
Glenda Gail Parker () 21,690 0.6%
William B. Redpath (L) 20,269 0.6%
Write in (Write-in) 3,178
TOTAL 3,643,294

2001 Governor

Mark Warner (D) 984,177 52.2%
M. L. Earley (R) 887,234 47.0%
William B. Redpath (L) 14,497 0.8%
Write In (Write-in) 813 .0%
TOTAL 1,886,721

Source: Virginia Department of Elections

Finances

WARNER, MARK ROBERT has run in 2 races for public office, winning 2 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $36,488,482. (note: seems to include only two senate races and not previous Governor  race).

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Select Committee on Intelligence (Vice Chairman)
Committee on Finance
Committee on Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs
Committee on the Budget
Committee on Rules & Administration

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Government Page

Issues

Governance

Transparency

On the Senate Budget Committee, Warner was appointed chairman of a bipartisan task force on government performance in 2009. Warner was a lead sponsor of the 2010 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), which imposed specific program performance goals across all federal agencies and set up a more transparent agency performance review process.

On May 21, 2013, Warner introduced the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (S. 994; 113th Congress), DATA. “The legislation requires standardized reporting of federal spending to be posted to a single website, allowing citizens to track spending in their communities and agencies to more easily identify improper payments, waste and fraud.” On November 6, 2013, the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs committee unanimously passed DATA.

On January 27, 2014, a version of the White House Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) marked up version of the bill was leaked. This White House version “move[s] away from standards and toward open data structures to publish information” and “requir[es] OMB in consultation with Treasury to review and, if necessary, revise standards to ensure accuracy and consistency through methods such as establishing linkages between data in agency financial systems…” Senator Warner’s responded with the following statement: “The Obama administration talks a lot about transparency, but these comments reflect a clear attempt to gut the DATA Act. DATA reflects years of bipartisan, bicameral work, and to propose substantial, unproductive changes this late in the game is unacceptable. We look forward to passing the DATA Act, which had near universal support in its House passage and passed unanimously out of its Senate committee. I will not back down from a bill that holds the government accountable and provides taxpayers the transparency they deserve.”

On April 10, 2014, the Senate voted by unanimous consent to pass the bill, which was then passed by the House in a voice vote on April 28, 2014.

Civil Rights

Gun laws

On April 17, 2013, Warner voted to expand background checks for gun purchases as part of the Manchin-Toomey Amendment.

In 2017, he called himself a strong supporter of second amendment rights and vowed to advocate for responsible gun ownership for hunting, recreation, and self-defense.

In January 2019, Warner was one of forty senators to introduce the Background Check Expansion Act, a bill that would require background checks for either the sale or transfer of all firearms including all unlicensed sellers. Exceptions to the bill’s background check requirement included transfers between members of law enforcement, loaning firearms for either hunting or sporting events on a temporary basis, providing firearms as gifts to members of one’s immediate family, firearms being transferred as part of an inheritance, or giving a firearm to another person temporarily for immediate self-defense.

Democracy

Campaign finance

In June 2019, Warner and Amy Klobuchar introduced the Preventing Adversaries Internationally from Disbursing Advertising Dollars (PAID AD) Act, a bill that would modify U.S. federal campaign finance laws to outlaw the purchasing of ads that name a political candidate and appear on platforms by foreign nationals in the midst of an election year.

Economy

Between 2010 and 2013, Warner invested considerable time and effort in leading the Senate’s Gang of Six, along with Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA). Together, Chambliss and Warner sought to craft a bipartisan plan along the lines of the Simpson-Bowles Commission to address U.S. deficits and debt.

Although the Gang of Six ultimately failed to produce a legislative “grand bargain”, they did agree on the broad outlines of a plan that included spending cuts, tax reforms that produced more revenue, and reforms to entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security—entitlement reforms that are opposed by most Democrats. Although President Obama showed interest in the plan, leaders in Congress from both parties kept a deal from being made. In 2011, the bipartisan Concord Coalition awarded Warner and Chambliss its Economic Patriots Award for their work with the Gang of Six.

Minimum wage

In April 2014, the United States Senate debated the Minimum Wage Fairness Act (S. 1737; 113th Congress). The bill would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938(FLSA) to increase the federal minimum wage for employees to $10.10 per hour over the course of a two-year period. The bill was strongly supported by President Barack Obama and many Democratic Senators, but strongly opposed by Republicans in the Senate and House. Warner expressed a willingness to negotiate with Republicans about some of the provisions of the bill, such as the timeline for the phase-in. Warner said that any increase needs to be done “in a responsible way.”

Finance

From the start of his Senate term, Warner attempted to replicate in Washington, D.C. the bipartisan partnerships that he used effectively during his tenure as Virginia governor. In 2010, Warner worked with a Republican colleague on the Banking Committee, Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN), to write a key portion of the Dodd-Frank Act that seeks to end taxpayer bailouts of failing Wall Street financial firms by requiring “advance funeral plans” for large financial firms.

In 2013, the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress gave Sens. Warner and Corker its Publius Award for their bipartisan work on financial reform legislation.

In 2018, Warner became one of the few Democrats in the Senate supporting a bill that would relax “key banking regulations”. As part of at least 11 other Democrats, Warner argued that the bill would “right-size post-crisis rules imposed on small and regional lenders and help make it easier for them to provide credit”. Chuck Schumer and Elizabeth Warren have stated their opposition to the legislation.

Health Care

On a video in his senate office, Warner promised Virginians, “I would not vote for a health-care plan that doesn’t let you keep health insurance you like.” [33]

He voted for the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA, commonly called Obamacare), helping the Senate reach the required sixty votes to prevent it from going to a filibuster. (As there were exactly 60 Democratic Senators at the time, each Democrat can be said to have cast the deciding vote.) He and 11 Senate freshmen discussed adding an amendment package aimed at addressing health care costs by expanding health IT and wellness prevention.

In January 2019, Warner was one of six Democratic senators to introduce the American Miners Act of 2019, a bill that would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to swap funds in excess of the amounts needed to meet existing obligations under the Abandoned Mine Land fund to the 1974 Pension Plan as part of an effort to prevent its insolvency as a result of coal company bankruptcies and the 2008 financial crisis. It also increased the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund tax and ensured that miners affected by the 2018 coal company bankruptcies would not lose their health care.

Safety

Defense

In 2011, Warner voted for the four-year extension of the USA PATRIOT Act. In 2011, he engaged Northern Virginia’s high-tech community in a pro-bono effort to correct burial mistakes and other U.S. Army management deficiencies at Arlington National Cemetery. In 2012, he successfully pushed the Navy to improve the substandard military housing in Hampton Roads.

Also in 2012, he pushed the Office of Personnel Management to address chronic backlogs in processing retirement benefits for federal workers, many of whom live in Washington’s northern Virginia suburbs. Warner was successful in pushing the Department of Veterans Affairs to expand access to PTSD treatment for female military veterans returning from service in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In August 2013, Warner was one of twenty-three Democratic senators to sign a letter to the Defense Department warning of some payday lenders “offering predatory loan products to service members at exorbitant triple digit effective interest rates and loan products that do not include the additional protections envisioned by the law” and asserting that service members along with their families “deserve the strongest possible protections and swift action to ensure that all forms of credit offered to members of our armed forces are safe and sound.”

Warner was awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal by U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, the Navy’s highest honor for a civilian, for his consistent support of Virginia’s military families and veterans.

Start ups, Saudi Arabia

Warner was the original Democratic sponsor of the Startup Act legislation and has partnered with the bill’s original author Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS) to introduce three iterations of the bill: Startup Act in 2011, Startup Act 2.0 in 2012 and Startup Act 3.0 in early 2013. Warner describes the legislation as the ‘logical next step’ following enactment of the bipartisan JOBS Act.”

In 2015, Warner criticized the Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen, saying: “I’m concerned in particular with some of the indiscriminate bombing in Yemen … [Gulf states] need to step up and they need to step up with more focus than the kind of indiscriminate bombing.”

In June 2017, Warner voted to support Trump’s $350 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia.

In May 2018, Warner voted for Gina Haspel to be the next CIA director.

In 2016, American foreign policy scholar Stefan Halper served as an FBI operative and contacted members of the Donald Trump Presidential campaign. In May 2018, Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, warned Republican lawmakers that it would be “potentially illegal” to reveal the identity of Stefan Halper.

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